June 24, 2010

Blemishes

Insiders' Guide How to Zap a Blemish Fast


An Interview With Diane S. Berson

Berson is a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City and a board member of the American Acne and Rosacea Society.

By Brooke Le Poer Trench

Many women wish their acne had ended with puberty, but unfortunately, we all have to deal with occasional breakouts well into adulthood. If you suffer from regular eruptions, your dermatologist should be able to prescribe medication that will treat the underlying cause. For the odd spot, however, there are easy ways to clear things up.

· Be strong. When you feel a pimple forming, resist the urge to squeeze. All you're doing is traumatizing the area and causing an inflammatory reaction that will result in further swelling, a longer healing time, and most likely a scar. (I know it's tempting to take care of a whitehead yourself, but those explode inward as well as out, which can worsen the infection.)

· Focus your efforts. If the pimple feels huge, gently press an ice cube on the spot for a few minutes to reduce inflammation. Use a salicylic acid cleanser, which unclogs the pores; then apply a spot treatment containing benzoyl peroxide, which kills bacteria and dries out the area. (The Neutrogena and BiorĂ© acne-treatment lines both make products with these ingredients that are excellent.) After a few minutes, dot on some oil-free concealer. It's fine to use your finger, though a brush might give you better coverage. Don't worry—makeup won't make things worse, and not even a dermatologist would expect you to walk around with blotches on your face.

· Make an appointment. If you have an important event and desperately need that pimple to disappear, a dermatologist can inject it with cortisone, which will shrink a blemish within 24 hours. I wouldn't get a facial if you need to look your best right afterward; they can inflame skin.

· Fade away. If the pimple leaves a pink mark, apply cortisone cream a few times a day for no more than a week to fade the spot, or see your dermatologist; she can prescribe something that will lighten the mark more quickly. And be vigilant about wearing sunscreen—any kind of skin discoloration will get even darker if you go out in the sun unprotected.

June 14, 2010

Makeup & Skincare Before Your Big Day

Flawless finish

Start a skincare regimen at least six months before your wedding day. If you don't already have one, visit a dermatologist who will help get you on track.


Skin savers

Purchase products that work with your skin—not against it. Harsh scrubs or cleansers will only make sensitive skin break out more, while mild cleansers won't effectively clean oily skin.


Top service

Get regular facials at a reputable salon. If you don't have a facialist, seek recommendations from friends and brides in your area.


Sun safety

Wear sunscreen every day. Seeking out a moisturizer with a built-in SPF (15 or higher, please!) is a foolproof way to make sure you incorporate it into your daily routine.


ABC’s of skin care

Don't forget that healthy skin doesn't only come from cleansers and moisturizers. Eat right, exercise and get plenty of sleep.


Best face forward

Use makeup to accent your best feature: Draw attention to your eyes, for example, by using subtly contrasting colors (think slate blue for brown eyes and soft violet for blue eyes).


A bit bolder

Your wedding day is not the time to attempt a new look—you want to feel comfortable in your own skin. But realize you’ll want to apply your makeup a bit darker than normal. Photographs can make you look washed out.


Hands on care

Starting weekly manicures at least two months prior to your wedding will give you the healthiest nails possible. Apply cuticle oil and moisturizer regularly at home.


Smile bright

Visit your dentist for professional whitening treatments, or use whitening toothpaste and a do-it-yourself bleaching kit at home.


Wax pretty

Schedule final waxing appointments a week or two before your big day. If you’ve never had your eyebrows shaped, start two months in advance to perfect the look

Brides Magazine

June 9, 2010

Sultry Nudes


Mocha, cappuccino, and nude shades create a glowing, natural effect that's perfect for summer.

Remember to always wear sunscreen and a moisturizer with a SPF of at least 30 in the summer to protect your skin from wrinkles, sagging skin, sunburn, and hyperpigmentation.

June 8, 2010

June 4, 2010

Flattering Makeup Shades for Women of Color

Whether your skin is shaded like Jasmine Guy or Angela Bassett, you'll look radiant and beautiful if you first identify the undertones in your skin.

African American women who fall on the warm end of the spectrum will look fantastic in these colors:

Peach   Gold   Bronze   Orange red    Brown

If you're more of a cool complexion, stick to:

Blue     Purple      Silver     Pink      Blue red

If your skin is very dark and you've always shied away from deep lipstick colors, you don't have to. You can try a neutral look with a lip color that closely matches your skin and top it with a light coat of clear gloss. With such natural lips, you can put the makeup focus on your eyes. Women with cool complexions can wear silver or charcoal eye shadow, while warm women can sport bronze eye color and a couple of coats of deep black mascara for maximum impact.

Iman and Makeup

About Iman the Woman


A stunning fashion model, Iman, started out thinking she was unattractive as a young girl. In her native country of Somalia, she was consistently teased about her long neck. It wasn’t until she came to the United State to model, that she discovered her unique neck was actually what made her beautiful. In her opinion, exotic sells and every woman should enhance her own distinctive individuality.

From her book, “The Beauty of Color,” Iman shares her favorite makeup products:

Blotting papers – for those shiny touchups.

Opaque Bronze Lip Gloss

Travel Fragrance

Mirrored Compact

Blush Stick – multipurpose necessity acts as an eye, lip or cheek color.

In 1975, when Iman arrived in the United States from Africa to model, she was discouraged by the makeup application on her exotic skin. Determined to find a better way, she learned from the artists on the photo shoots and began to apply her own makeup. By mixing and creating her own products, she was able to individualize her makeup routine to match her unique colors and skin tones.

Through this discovery, she started to see the need for cosmetics geared toward more global women. In 1994, she launched Iman Cosmetics, skin care and makeup for skin of color. Her goal was to celebrate the diversity of skin color and ethnicity. The international cosmetic line has been successful with both professional and everyday women: empowering women of all colors to look and feel great. More Here.

June 1, 2010